By William Wolf

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Alec Baldwin gets a chance to show his serious acting chops In “Blind,” directed by Michael Mailer (Norman’s son) from a screenplay by John Buffalo Mailer (also Norman’s son) from a story by Diane Fisher. However, despite Baldwin’s often affecting performance, the plot is very predictable.

Baldwin plays Bill Oakland, an irascible novelist with a writer’s block blinded in an accident. He is also a professor, and he is thoroughly bitter at his new lot in life. He does takes an interest in an aspiring young writer, who seeks him as a possible mentor. But Oakland is consumed by anger and spews insults.

The potential for change arrives when Demi Moore as Suzanne Dutchman shows up to serve court-ordered community service time at the center where Oakland is recuperating. Her nasty, arrogant husband, Mark (Dylan McDermott), has been convicted of fraudulent stock maneuvers, but she is deemed not to have been aware of his crime, yet technically involved.

True to form Oakland is hostile at first, but he gradually warms to her, and she begins to see the good side of him. Moore gives an appealing performance despite the clichés. Love blooms. But problems surface when Suzanne’s husband is free and jealous of what he perceives. In one ugly scene, he beats hell out of his blind victim.

Poor Suzanne. What choice should she make, given that her husband is a louse but they are still attached? Poor Oakland. Will his chance for a brighter life be jeopardized? And what about his writer’s block? You’ll be able to provide your own spoilers. A Vertical Entertainment release. Reviewed July 14, 2017.

  

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